Lorenzo Chinnici

Lorenzo Chinnici
Born in Merí, northeastern Sicily in 1942, Lorenzo belongs to the same family as Rocco Chinnici (an important magistrate during the 1980’s in Sicily), he interested himself from infancy in colours and art.
His first instruction came from Renato Guttuso whom he met in 1953 at Barcellona Pozzo di Gotto at an exhibition.
The master, struck by the attention to the paintings shown by the “youngster”, offers to teach him how to paint.
There will follow a long association with fellow Sicilian painter Salvatore La Rosa, known by the pen name Furnari. Already established in Liguria, on his return to Sicily, his birthplace, he gets to know the young Lorenzo who, after the meeting with Guttuso is already irredeemibly attracted to the career of artist.
It will be Furnari that gives Chinnici his first colours and initiates him into the secrets of Art.
Numerous times Furnari will exhibit with his pupil, at least until the beginning of the 1960’s.
In 1965, during the course of a very popular impromptu exhibition, Lorenzo Chinnici is noticed and awarded a prize by Salvatore Pugliatti, distinguished jurist, chancellor of the University of Messina and distinguished arts expert.
In the meantime Lorenzo Chinnici receives his diploma and so becomes a professional Artist.
During the course of his career he will frequently meet with fellow artists especially due to his association with the enlightened proprietor of the “Meceden - Milazzo” gallery, Nino Caruso, who since 1969 both in Sicily and abroad has promoted the art of Chinnici.

Lorenzo also has the opportunity to visit the art workshop of Salvatore Fiume, with whom he establishes a strong personal rapport which also sees the exchange of paintings between the two artists on special family occasions.

During the years he becomes acquainted with other great artists: Mario Rossello, Giuseppe Migneco, Aligi Sassu, Ernesto Treccani, and Ugo Nespolo. In these meetings Chinnici always receives positive feedback from his colleagues, feedback which encourages him in his vocation and work as an artist and fortifies him in the pain of the illness which has always afflicted him.

After his forties, the burden of pain increases and Lorenzo, who has never lost the fire of the artists passion and the love of his land, in the 1980’s and 90’s goes on a spiritual retreat to Assisi.
These times of deep introspection help the artist to return to painting newly fortified and determined to do more and better work.

Avoiding notoriety, disinterested in commercial painting and easy success, Lorenzo Chinnici paints for himself, just to work out and bring forth the thoughts and feelings which alternate within his own mind.
Chinnici has followed, through the years his own artistic vein, which he practises in whatever medium is appropriate from watercolours to murals, from frescos on stone.

He continues to work and live in Sicily.
He has been diagnosed for some time to suffer from macular degeneration.

The following critics have written of him: L. Barbera, M. Truscello, G. C Capritti, Maugeri, Nasillo, N. Billè, S. Greco, N. Ferrau, S. Pugliatti, E. Caruso, N. Cacia, M. Danzè, G. Anania, A. Sciuto, M. Francolini, F. Pasini, N. Ferrara, G. Gaudio, F. Baglini, S. Feder, B. Nickolls, C. Carducci, E. Comey, G. Cardone, T. Forrest, YM. Lamine, E. Catalano, Deborah Blakeley, Cav. F. Di Gregorio, C. Vannuzzi Landini, A. Lombardo, R. Pacheco Escalona, F. Bellola, J. Tatano, G. Gorga, G. Carfí Urso, Vittorio Sgarbi, E.Gollini.

His name may be found in the most prestigious publications on contemporary Italian art.